Category Archives: Uncategorized

Gymnastics documentary coming up

Alabama gymnastics coach Sarah Patterson cheers on her team. (AP Photo)

Alabama gymnastics coach Sarah Patterson cheers on her team. (AP Photo)

ESPN Films produced a documentary that will focus on the rivalry between the Alabama gymnastics team and Georgia. The program will air at 6 p.m. on April 30 on ESPNU.

The feud between Alabama coach Sarah Patterson vs. Georgia’s Suzanne Yoculan.  When they arrived on their campuses, both programs were on the verge of folding.

The Crimson Tide and the Gym Dogs were having little success, and Patterson and Yoculan were brought in to help salvage what was left. What no one could have guessed at the time is that not only would the two programs become the best in the nation, but the coaches would become pioneers and mavericks of the sport forever.

In the 25 years that Yoculan and Patterson coached against each other, they filled arenas with passionate fans while winning a combined 21 SEC Championships and 14 NCAA titles.

“Sarah & Suzanne,” directed by Joie Jacoby, is the story of two women dominating college gymnastics, while creating one of the most heated rivalries in SEC history.

Tide gets 15th verbal commitment

Defensive end Christian Bell of Birmingham’s Hoover High verbally committed to the Alabama football team on Wednesday afternoon, he announced on his Twitter page.

“I am officially committed to the University of Alabama,” he wrote.

Bell, a 6-foot-4, 220-pounder, is a three-star athlete, according to 247 Sports. He’s the No. 11 prospect in the state and No. 14 weak-side defensive end in the country.

Various other schools offered him a scholarship including Mississippi State, Akron, Louisville and South Carolina.

Bell becomes the 15th commitment for the Crimson Tide in the 2015 recruiting class and the fourth in-state athlete. He joins offensive guard Lester Cotton of Tuscaloosa, running back Desherrius Flowers of Mobile and defensive end Anfernee Jennings of Dadeville.

He’s also the fourth defensive end in the class. The others are Mehki Brown, Jonathan Ledbetter and Jennings.

Alabama already has the No. 1 ranked recruiting class for 2015. The Crimson Tide has one five-star athlete and 11 four-star athletes.

Thomas Burrows is a top closer

Alabama players congratulate Thomas Burrows (40) after his save in Alabama's 3-2 win over Louisiana-Monroe in an NCAA college baseball game Tuesday, April 1, 2014, at Sewell-Thomas Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Alabama players congratulate Thomas Burrows (40) after his save in Alabama’s 3-2 win over Louisiana-Monroe in an NCAA college baseball game Tuesday, April 1, 2014, at Sewell-Thomas Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Alabama closer Thomas Burrows is one of 50 players named to the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association (NCBWA) Mid-Season Stopper of the Year Watch List.

Burrows, from Florence, is one of four freshman and one of seven closers from SEC schools selected to the list.

The left-hander has made 18 appearances with a 4-1 record and is 8-for-8 in save opportunities. His eight saves are tied for the fourth most in the SEC and 24th in the country.

Burrows owns a 0.73 ERA with 26 strikeouts in 24.2 innings and is holding opponents to a .105 batting average.

“When he comes into the game, everyone in the dugout and field knows we are going to win the game,” coach Mitch Gaspard said.

SEC’s Mike Slive, part 2

Southeastern Conference Commissioner Mike Slive speaks during a press conference. (AP Photo)

Southeastern Conference Commissioner Mike Slive speaks during a press conference. (AP Photo)

BIRMINGHAM — SEC commissioner Mike Slive’s main objective at the moment is for the Big Five conferences to gain autonomy within the NCAA to be better help athletes.

However, there are more issues on his mind.

Slive shared them with the media Monday during an Associated Press Sports Editors regional meeting in at the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame.

Here are his thoughts on various issues surrounding the SEC from a question and answer session.

Should have the 10-second rule about waiting to snap the football passed?

“We needed a competition committee. That issue should have been placed in a football competition committee to look at the game. We’ve done that in men’s basketball. We meet every year to see how the game is being played and the officiating affects the game. That would have been a perfect subject to look at the game, and then come up with an interpretation. Then it goes to the rules people if they recommend something. This debate exposed a glaring error on the process.”

Are you worried about the lack of cable carriers for the SEC Network?

“Instead of being disappointed, we are actually ecstatic. No one could announce a distribution provider at the time of the announcement of the network. No one could announce they have a national distributor five months before lunch. Everyone can get the SEC network. You get it on Dish, if not you can change to Dish. Our goal is to be fully distributed by launch on the 14th of August.”

Will there be a nine-game conference football schedule?

“We have had a lot of discussion at different levels. We have been working on it the last year. We’ll decide soon for the 2016 season. We are looking at eight games with or without permanence (against cross-divisional rival), nine games with or without permanence and maybe one offshoot of that. Of all the formats there’s a series of advantages and disadvantage. People will have to make a decision knowing there could be disadvantages.”

How do you feel about the football playoff?

“I feel pretty good about it. I’ve talked about it for 10 years. I felt the polls treated undefeated teams nicely and it’s hard to go undefeated in our league. It was a long arduous task to get where we need to be. Now I didn’t know we would win seven (national titles) in a row, but we are in a better place now. One piece that means a lot to me is that we participate in the Orange Bowl three to five times in 12 years. That’s something new. The other something new is the Sugar Bowl and where the game is played. I wanted it played on Jan. 1 in prime time. The Sugar Bowl will follow the Rose Bowl. The next generation of fans will see those two games in the same window, and that will make the Sugar Bowl the kind of game the Rose Bowl is.”

Is four a good number for teams in the playoff?

“It’s a good number because it’s the number we can do. The good thing about the playoff, it doesn’t change the structure. It doesn’t affect the school calendar and doesn’t go late in January. It’s one (extra) game for two teams.

How has Missouri and Texas A&M fit in with the SEC?

“They’ve been great additions in every way. The football scheduling has been the hardest thing. That has to get done still.”

Should off-the-field football coaches be limited?

“There’s a lot of discussion about personnel in terms of coaching staffs. That’s one of the issues the five conferences will address once we get the autonomy.”

How do you feel about the 1-and-done basketball players?

“It’s not a good rule. It’s a bad rule. It’s academically a bad rule. When a young man leaves after one year it’s statistically low he’ll come back and get a degree. If he stays two or three it’s easier to come back. It’ not our rule. It’s not the NCAA rule. It’s an NBA rule. If they changed the rule we would be delighted so our kids stay longer.”

Do you still want basketball to improve nonconference scheduling?

“Some schedules have already been made. It’s what happens going forward what counts. I can tell you we’ve had requests from schools about who they schedule, and we said absolutely not.”

Is the basketball officials work schedule too much? Should it be regulated?

“We would have to change the entire structure to do that. They are independent contractors. We assign them. We would like them to officiate a reasonable amount of games. To do that, we need a new structure. We haven’t thought about it.”

Should there be a universal drug policy?

“I don’t think you’ll see a national policy. Our league has discussed it and we decided to not have a league-wide policy. There are so many issues to a young man. They want to treat it as behavioral issue and not drug issue. A conference-wide policy doesn’t give enough flexibility.”

Can you make media access to teams better?

“We tired. A few years ago the conference put forth an access proposal, but we could not get it passed. I favor access, it’s important, but I can’t get it passed.”

Nick Saban on SEC schedule

Alabama head coach Nick Saban watches from the field during Alabama's A-Day NCAA college football spring game on Saturday, April 19, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Alabama head coach Nick Saban watches from the field during Alabama’s A-Day NCAA college football spring game on Saturday, April 19, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Alabama football coach Nick Saban stopped by Huntsville on the first stop of the Crimson Carvan on Tuesday.

He spoke to the media before he went to talk with the fans. The hot topic was the SEC schedule and how it will change in 2016.

Here’s the full story.

The gist is will the permanent rivals (Alabama vs. Tennessee) be gone. Saban thinks so.

What are your thoughts on these rivalry games. Should the SEC keep them? Or do you want to see more different teams each year?

SEC commissioner pushing for NCAA changes

SEC Commissioner Mike Slive talks with reporters.   (AP Photo)

SEC Commissioner Mike Slive talks with reporters.
(AP Photo)

BIRMINGHAM — SEC commissioner Mike Silve’s main goal each day is build the future strength of the conference.

He’s in the middle of a push for the five power conferences to gain governing autonomy within the NCAA structure by the fall.

Major changes could be in store for the 65 schools in the SEC, Big Ten, Pac-12, Big 12 and Atlantic Coast conferences if approved by the NCAA Board of Directors later this week.

Slive was a special guest speaker at the Associated Press Sports Editors regional meeting on Monday at the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame.

He outlined the goal of the Big Five to improve the lives of the athletes to ensure full cost scholarship, health, nutrition, a better chance for a degree, improve rules for support from agents and advisers, and give athletes a voice and vote on rules that govern them.

He shared where he feels the SEC is headed in this regard. The following comes from a question and answer session with the media.

What is the proposal about with the NCAA?
“Five conferences have put together a proposal to create autonomy in certain areas. The nexus for the autonomy, it’s what we call ‘The Vision for the 21st Century’ with our relationship with the student-athlete. Up until now, it’s been the level playing field in NCAA. It puts the institution in primacy. If you replace that with the student-athlete, you do things in the best interest of student-athlete instead of institution. That’s a difficult issue, and I understand that. As we move forward, the five conferences have the ability to put he student athlete first.”

Does that follow the player unionization movement?
“Student-athletes shouldn’t be employees. If you put that aside, what’s being asked for (by union backers) are the same things the five of us put forward last fall. What’s the substance of the issue, not the nature. What we are trying to accomplish are these issues.”

When did this start?
“We are on this road since early fall when the five conferences outlined the future. The goal for the NCAA to have something done is have something done by August and be able to do something after August.”

Should an athlete make money?
“What I outlined relates to the mission of the institutions. It’s in the context of higher education. Outside of that, it’s more problematic. I haven’t focused on that.”

Is this too little, too late?
“I don’t think it’s too little. There’s an element of frustration that we started last summer. Turning the NCAA is not unlike turning an aircraft carrier from north to south. There are some of the things we wanted to get on the table much earlier.”

Is this reaction to what’s going on at Northwestern?
“I’ve listened to the Big Ten talk. I don’t know about labor law. It’s limited in scope in football players, Northwestern and private institutions. What’s of interest are the issues we are trying to get our arms around.”

Is it difficult to get the Big Five to agree?
“We are pleased — all five conferences — we’ve come this far in the NCAA structural procedures. There are some structural matters we have to work our way through. Part of that is we have to create our own legislative process. Then each conference must develop legislation in that structure. Although we are pleased where we are, there are a couple of elements we would like to take a look at and get a structure we want. We want a structure that involves all 65 institutions. We have ideas how we should do that. That’s a topic of conversation as we move forward.”

Are you concerned about the view of the Big Five for doing this?
“If you are putting student-athletes first then you are doing the right thing. They would have a voice and vote in legislation for all, anything and everything.”

What’s the difference between the Big Five and others?
“The enforcement process that impacts our 65 institutions than other institutions. Timing is another one. If we have the right issues with other institutions.”

Can other conferences join the Big Five?
“That hasn’t been talked about.”

How certain is this to pass?
“The reports are encouraging. I’m optimistic it will get out for comment. The adoption will come in August.”

What’s the biggest concern for you?
“The future. For me, there’s no such thing as today. When I wake up in the morning, it’s about tomorrow. What can I do tangibly or intangibly do to ensure vibrance of the SEC. That’s five years, 10 years from now. We’ve done a lot of things right. We’ve changed the culture in rules, we’ve expanded, we added a network. What’s next tangibly? If not tangible, what can we do intangibly?”

Carson Tinker tells his inspirational story

Alabama Tinker Ordeal FootballHere’s the Associated Press story on former Alabama player Carson Tinker‘s story off loss and comeback from the Tuscaloosa tornado.

HOOVER (AP) — Carson Tinker is no longer that no-name guy who delivers the ball on punts and kicks.

The Jacksonville Jaguars’ long snapper lost that anonymity nearly three years ago when a tornado ripped through Tuscaloosa killing girlfriend Ashley Harrison and putting him on a hard road to physical and emotional recovery.

As an Alabama football player, Tinker became one of the faces of a vicious storm that left dozens dead in Tuscaloosa alone.

He has since shared his experience with youth groups and churches and written a newly released book — “A Season To Remember: Faith in the Midst of the Storm.” Tinker always tries to keep the message the same: It’s not about what he went through, but how he’s emerged and with renewed faith.

“I don’t want anybody to ever think that I’m trying to tell my sob story to people,” Tinker said. “Nobody wants to hear anybody’s sob story and I don’t want people to think that I’m trying to do that. I’m trying to take people to what I thought was the darkest point of my life and show how God got me to where I am now. I’m hoping that people can be encouraged by that.”

That darkest point for Tinker and others in the college town came on April 27, 2011. Tinker held Harrison tight while they huddled with his two roommates and two dogs in a bedroom closet.

“We heard the house cracking and coming apart, windows crashing, walls tumbling,” he wrote. “Then, just like that, the roof was ripped off right over our heads, and the darkness of the closet was suddenly flooded with gray, rainy daylight. I could feel us being picked up. It was like having one of those dreams where you’re falling, except just the opposite. Falling up. I held on to Ashley with all my might as we were sucked out of the house.

“The next thing I remember is standing some 75 yards away, across the street in the field, screaming Ashley’s name. Exactly what happened in between or how much time had passed I’ll never really know.”

Tinker sustained a concussion, injured his snapping wrist and was left with a wound on his right ankle that required rehabilitation and ultimately a skin graft performed in the locker room after a game.

He was also left with a platform few long snappers ever get to share his faith and his story, including his parents’ battles with cancer during his youth.

Tinker is donating proceeds from book sales to his foundation “Be a Blessing.” He cites Bible verses without pause throughout an interview while skipping the high-carbs portion of his plate of spaghetti and meatballs.

He said writing about the aftermath of the tornado and about Harrison was painful. It was equally emotional for his mother, Debbie, to read. Like her son, she focuses on the positives of the here and now.

“If he were not my son, he would (still) be one of my very favorite people in the whole world,” Debbie Tinker said. “He’s an awesome individual, and I don’t say that as a mom. I am biased but he truly has a heart for God and for helping other people, and I believe that came from the adversity he has experienced in his life.”

Tinker wonders if that’s partly why fans connected with him, beyond being able to relate because they’ve seen his story or lost a loved one of their own. He didn’t need a bad snap to get noticed.

“If I’m doing my job, nobody’s ever heard of me,” Tinker said. “If nobody’s ever heard of me that means I’m doing my job, and I was completely fine with that. But it’s just really cool how God has used me. Maybe people feel like they can’t connect with like (former Alabama teammates) Mark Ingram or Julio Jones, but I’m just an average guy. I’m not that athletic. I can just throw a ball between my legs.

“Maybe people feel like they can connect with me more, which I think is pretty cool. I’m just an average guy. I’m nobody special.”

People applaud for Alabama football player Carson Tinker, center, as he is honored by Gov. Robert Bentley, not shown,  during his State of the State address in Montgomery, Ala. (AP Photo)

People applaud for Alabama football player Carson Tinker, center, as he is honored by Gov. Robert Bentley, not shown, during his State of the State address in Montgomery, Ala. (AP Photo)

The day in Tide sports

Former NFL player Rolando McClain talks with members of the media during pro day at the University of Alabama, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Former NFL player Rolando McClain talks with members of the media during pro day at the University of Alabama, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Jeff Garrett from Oldsmar, Fla., signed his letter of intent to play for the Alabama men’s basketball team Monday, the school announced.

Garret, originally from Gadsden, but played the 2013-14 season at Oldsmar Christian School in Oldsmar, Fla. He is a 6-foot-7, 210-pound small forward. 247 Sports ranks him as a three-star athlete and the No. 28 prospect in Florida.

He had offers from South Alabama, Murray State, College of Charleston and Duquesne. He’s a late pickup for the loss two players, Algie Key and Carl Engstrom, who left the program at the end of the season.

Coach Anthony Grant planned to fill out his roster through recruiting, so he’s looking for one more player.

Garrett joins point guard Justin Coleman, guard Devin Mitchell and forward Riley Norris in the recruiting class for the coming season.

Garrett averaged 18.3 points, 10.1 rebounds, 4.0 assists and 2.0 blocks per game last season. He was a standout at Gadsden City High where he earned 2A first-team all-state honors in 2013. During his junior season, Garrett averaged 14.4 points and 10.2 rebounds per game.

Alabama baseball player Thomas Burrows of Florence was named the SEC Freshman of the Week. Burrows made three pitching relief appearances last week and picked up three saves.

Burrows closed out three of the four wins last week. He saved the game against UAB and out both wins in the Tennessee series.

Former Alabama and Decatur great Rolando McClain says his NFL playing days are over again. Read more here.

The Crimson Tide is about to get a lot of money with a huge multimedia rights deal. Read more here.

The Peach Bowl announced that it’s bringing back the name Peach Bowl. The title sponsor, a Southern chicken joint, is part of the name not the whole name now.

I hate it when sponsors take over the name. It takes away from the region and what the bowl is trying to honor.

The first stop of the Crimson Caravan is Tuesday in Huntsville. Tickets are still available.

Left tackle fallout

Cameron Robinson, the top offensive tackle in the nation, committed to Alabama.

Cameron Robinson, the top offensive tackle in the nation, committed to Alabama.

The Alabama football team needs a new starting left tackle, and after spring practice it comes down to freshman Cameron Robinson and sophomore Brandon Greene.

Robinson received meaning reps during the spring game and showed a lot of upside. There’s a lot of work to be done.

The five-star recruit is supposed to still be in high school, but he graduated early. He should be a lot better by the time the first game comes around.

Here’s what coach Nick Saban had to say about Robinson after the spring game.

“I think Cam is going to be a work in progress,” he said. “He’s a very talented guy, and he made some mistakes today. For example, we threw a screen, he blocked the wrong guy, and because he blocked the wrong guy, the screen got intercepted and run back for a touchdown. But I think all those things are learning opportunities. Everyone talks about experience, but how do you get experience? You get experience by making mistakes. We need for him to learn from those mistakes, which he will, and he’ll develop and improve. He did some good things, and he’s done some really good things all spring long, but we have been consistently better on the offensive line when he’s playing. He’s a very good pass blocker, but my expectation would be that for a guy that’s a freshman and only been here a couple months, he still has a lot to learn.”

Saying the team is better with him in the game sounds like an endorsement.

Life as a media coach at A-Day

Defensive coordinator Kriby Smart works with the defense between series.

Defensive coordinator Kriby Smart works with the defense between series.

Make sure to check out my Alabama football team story in Monday’s TimesDaily and Decatur Daily.

I recount how my time as a media coach for the White team went during A-Day. I go into the locker room before the game, at halftime and after the game, plus was in the middle of the chaos of the game.

The experience created an interesting perspective. I’ve been on the sidelines of many games, but not in the locker room in a long time.

Feel free to ask me anything on the blog from the experience of seeing behind the scenes at an Alabama football game.

Offensive line coach Mario Cristobal works with the offense.

Offensive line coach Mario Cristobal works with the offense.

Spring practice awards

Wide receiver ArDarius Stewart (13) is pushed out of bounds by defensive back Nick Perry (27) after a a reception for a first down during Alabama's A-Day NCAA college football spring game Saturday, April 19, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Wide receiver ArDarius Stewart (13) is pushed out of bounds by defensive back Nick Perry (27) after a a reception for a first down during Alabama’s A-Day NCAA college football spring game Saturday, April 19, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

My notebook in Sunday’s editions of the TimeDaily and Decatur Daily has the players of the Alabama A-Day game. It also references the spring practice award winners.

Due to space limitation, those awards where not listed. Here they are in full.

Lee Roy Jordan Headhunter Award – Jalston Fowler, Reggie Ragland

Jerry Duncan “I Like to Practice” Award – Chris Black, DJ Pettway, Bradley Sylve, Nick Perry

Billy Neighbors Defensive Lineman Award – A’Shawn Robinson

Paul Crane Offensive Lineman Award – Austin Shepherd

Bobby Johns Defensive Back Award – Landon Collins, Jarrick Williams

Johnny Musso Offensive Back Award – T.J. Yeldon, Derrick Henry

Ray Perkins Receiver Award – Amari Cooper, Christion Jones

Woodrow Lowe Linebacker Award – Trey Depriest

Derrick Thomas Community Service Award – Arie Kouandjio, O.J. Howard

Bear Bryant Outstanding Non-Scholarship Award – Paul Waldrop, Tyler Owens, Parker Barrineau, Josh Dickerson

Ozzie Newsome Most Improved Freshman Award – Cam Robinson, Tony Brown, Jonathan Allen, Tim Williams, Eddie Jackson, Robert Foster

Bart Starr Most Improved Player Award – Geno Smith, Xzavier Dickson, Leon Brown, Jarran Reed, Brandon Ivory, Grant Hill

Mal Moore Leadership Award – Brian Vogler, Denzel Devall

Sylvester Croom Commitment to Excellence Award – Blake Sims, Ryan Kelly

Dwight Stephenson Lineman of the A-Day Game Award – DJ Pettway, Jonathan Allen

Dixie Howell Memorial Most Valuable Player of the A-Day Game Award – T.J. Yeldon

Alabama offensive lineman Austin Shepherd (79) works through drills during the NCAA college football team's spring practice, Tuesday, April 15, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Alabama offensive lineman Austin Shepherd (79) works through drills during the NCAA college football team’s spring practice, Tuesday, April 15, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Basketball gets a commitment

Jeff Garrett from Oldsmar, Fla., announced his commitment to play for the Alabama men’s basketball team Sunday.

“Next year I will be going to university of Alabama,” he wrote on his Twitter.

His high school team Oldsmar Christian School’s Twitter confirmed his commitment.

Garrett is a 6-foot-7, 210-pound small forward. 247 Sports ranks him as a three-star athlete and the No. 28 prospect in Florida.

He had offers from South Alabama, Murray State, College of Charleston and Duquesne. He’s a late pickup for the loss two players, Algie Key and Carl Engstrom, who left the program at the end of the season.

Coach Anthony Grant planned to fill out his roster through recruiting, so he’s looking for one more.

Garrett joins point guard Justin Coleman, guard Devin Mitchell and forward Riley Norris in the recruiting class for the coming season.

Images from A-Day

This gallery contains 8 photos.

Alabama wide receiver Raheem Falkins (80) catches a pass and is tackled by Alabama linebacker Dillon Lee during Alabama’s A-Day NCAA college football spring game Saturday, April 19, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

A-Day aftermath

Alabama quarterback Blake Sims (6) drops back to pass during Alabama's A-Day NCAA college football spring game on Saturday, April 19, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Alabama quarterback Blake Sims (6) drops back to pass during Alabama’s A-Day NCAA college football spring game on Saturday, April 19, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Alabama football coach Nick Saban stated the obvious in my previous blog, saying no one, or team, has a bad spring game.

However, my impressions were that the Crimson Tide didn’t come across very impressive. My main story in Sunday’s TimesDaily and Decatur Daily looks at how the defense won the day and the quarterback competition remains up in the air.

That was expected before spring practice began. The defense has plenty of athletes that have to be refined. It’s going to take time, but the Crimson Tide will get there.

The offense is always behind because of all the moving parts. And this year there’s a new offensive coordinator in Lane Kiffin.

Alabama doesn’t throw all its playbook for all to see in the spring game, and it wasn’t even all installed.

However, the quarterback deal is interesting. Cooper Bateman looked really good compared to Blake Sims. Saban says Sims was the guy in spring practice and the scrimmages, but we are not allowed to see that.

The only public viewing was the spring game and Bateman was much better. From that, I would make Bateman my starter.

Running back Kenyon Drake fumbled again. I would find a defensive position to play for him.

Here’s my notebook that ran Sunday. It looks at the team’s special teams problems, has an injury update and more.

Alabama quarterback Cooper Bateman throws a pass during Alabama's A-Day NCAA college football spring game Saturday, April 19, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Alabama quarterback Cooper Bateman throws a pass during Alabama’s A-Day NCAA college football spring game Saturday, April 19, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

A-Day recruiting fallout

Alabama coach Nick Saban reacts to a breakdown with defensive players Alabama defensive back Jabriel Washington (23) and linebacker Dillon Lee (25) during Alabama's A-Day NCAA college football spring game Saturday, April 19, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Alabama coach Nick Saban reacts to a breakdown with defensive players Alabama defensive back Jabriel Washington (23) and linebacker Dillon Lee (25) during Alabama’s A-Day NCAA college football spring game Saturday, April 19, 2014, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo)

Several recruits visited the Alabama football team during A-Day and four of them committed after the game.

Five-star cornerback Minkah Fitzpatrick of St. Peter’s Prep in Jersey City, N.J., picked the the Crimson Tide over 30 other offers. Fitzpatrick, at 6-foot, 193 pounds, is the No. 1 prospect in New Jersey and No. 4 cornerback in the country, according to 247 Sports.

Four-star safety Shawn Burgess-Becker, a 6-1, 185-pounder from Pompano Beach, Fla., announced his intentions on Twitter. Burgess-Becker, out of Monarch High, is the No. 18 prospect in Florida and the No. 9 athlete in the nation.

Then his teammate, receiver Calvin Ridley, committed. The 6-2, 170-pounder is a four-star athlete who is the No. 10 prospect in Florida and No. 3 receiver in the nation.

Leo Lewis of Brookhaven, Miss., was the last commitment. The four-star athlete is the No. 3 prospect in Mississippi and the No. 5 inside linebacker in the nation.

Alabama has 14 commitments in the 2015 recruiting class with the commitments from its second cornerback, safety and receiver, and first linebacker.

Four-star wide receiver Jovon Durante of Miami reportedly committed, but it taking more time to think it over.